Posts Tagged "manga"
A comiXologist Recommends:
Eric Arroyo recommends Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga #1

In 1966, while the Adam West Batman series was becoming a phenomenon, Jiro Kuwata took Batman to Japan in the pages of Shonen King Magazine, depicting a familiar-looking hero through a black-and-white, horror-scifi filter. After highlighting the series in the collection Bat-Manga!: The Secret History of Batman in Japan, DC is now releasing weekly chapters from the original Batman manga, and the first two story arcs have recently wrapped up on ComiXology.

Instead of radically changing the Batman mythos for a Japanese audience, Kuwata brings grim but over-the-top villains and a ’60s science action aesthetic to Gotham City. The magic of Kuwata’s Batman stories comes from his marriage of disparate elements. Lord Death Man, the rogue in the opening arc, exemplifies this: he comes out of the shadows with a grizzly visage and power over death itself, but he’s as theatrical as he is creepy. Here, grim and ruthless villains add a texture of horror to ludicrous and delightful action stories. 

These stories tumble through tragic origin stories and chilling nightmares, while hitting absurd set pieces along the way, like a climactic battle atop a giant monument to Batman. With their unique perspective, Kuwata’s Batman stories can use these playful situations to subvert our expectations; while Batman vs Doctor Faceless appears like a traditional villain origin, it goes in farcical directions to pull the reader into a fresh and serious twist.

Kuwata’s Batman is also a testament to the strengths of mid-‘60s manga storytelling. Using efficient line work and paneling, Kuwata clearly depicts impactful action that flows through the page. Occasional spot-color adds an extra expressive element to stories full of rich hatching and pen-line texture.

If you love diving into vintage action manga like Cyborg 009, or you’re taking advantage of Batman’s 75th anniversary to explore other interpretations of the character, like in Batman ’66, pick up Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga. Come for Lord Death Man, stay for the wrecking-ball surfing.

[Read Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga!]

Eric Alexander Arroyo is a Brooklyn-based cartoonist and a Digital Editor at comiXology. He’s probably drawing giant robots and listening to ABBA.

For today’s #MangaMonday, we’ve teamed up with VIZ to give you $2 off over 1,000 different Manga titles!

Click here to start browsing

(VIZ titles are only available in the US and Canada)

comiXology Unbound: #MangaMonday
Bleach
Ichigo Kurosaki has always been able to see ghosts, but this ability doesn’t change his life nearly as much as his close encounter with Rukia Kuchiki, a Soul Reaper and member of the mysterious Soul Society. While fighting a Hollow, an evil spirit that preys on humans who display psychic energy, Rukia attempts to lend Ichigo some of her powers so that he can save his family; but much to her surprise, Ichigo absorbs every last drop of her energy. Now a full-fledged Soul Reaper himself, Ichigo quickly learns that the world he inhabits is one full of dangerous spirits and, along with Rukia—who is slowly regaining her powers—it’s Ichigo’s job to protect the innocent from Hollows and help the spirits themselves find peace.

With the addition of VIZ to the comiXology family in North America, #MangaMondays will never be the same! Come back every Monday for a new Manga recommendation!

comiXology Unbound: #MangaMonday↳Death Note

Light tests the boundaries of the Death Note’s powers as L and the police begin to close in. Luckily Light’s father is the head of the Japanese National Police Agency and leaves vital information about the case lying around the house. With access to his father’s files, Light can keep one step ahead of the authorities. But who is the strange man following him, and how can Light guard against enemies whose names he doesn’t know?

Death Note Vol. 1 is only $4.99 for a limited time!
[Read Death Note on comiXology]
With the addition of VIZ to the comiXology family in North America, #MangaMondays will never be the same! Come back every Monday for a new Manga recommendation!
comiXology Unbound: #MangaMonday
Death Note
Light tests the boundaries of the Death Note’s powers as L and the police begin to close in. Luckily Light’s father is the head of the Japanese National Police Agency and leaves vital information about the case lying around the house. With access to his father’s files, Light can keep one step ahead of the authorities. But who is the strange man following him, and how can Light guard against enemies whose names he doesn’t know?
Death Note Vol. 1 is only $4.99 for a limited time!

[Read Death Note on comiXology]


With the addition of VIZ to the comiXology family in North America, #MangaMondays will never be the same! Come back every Monday for a new Manga recommendation!

Couldn’t get enough of Edge of Tomorrow? Check out the manga version of All You Need Is Kill, the story that inspired the movie!

comiXology Unbound: #MangaMonday
One Piece
As a child, Monkey D. Luffy dreamed of becoming the King of the Pirates. But his life changed when he accidentally gained the power to stretch like rubber…at the cost of never being able to swim again! Now Luffy, with the help of a motley collection of pirate wannabes, is setting off in search of the “One Piece,” said to be the greatest treasure in the world…

[Read One Piece on comiXology]


With the addition of VIZ to the comiXology family in North America, #MangaMondays will never be the same! Come back every Monday for a new Manga recommendation!

(via onepiecesunny)

A comiXologist Recommends - MANGA EDITION:
Harris Smith recommends Death Note

Manga is hitting comiXology in a big way this week with the addition of Viz to our slate of publishers.  Among the first wave of titles are several popular favorites (Dragon Ball Z, Naruto) and cult classics (Nana, One-Punch Man).  Falling squarely in the middle is Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata’s Death Note.  Originally published from 2003 to 2006, Death Note became something of a media phenomenon in Japan, inspiring a novel, a video game, an Anime series and three live action feature films.

Odd but eminently readable, Death Note tells the story of Light, a bored teenager who discovers a book that allows him to cause the death of anyone whose name and face he knows.   The book belongs to Ryuk, one of the most remarkably designed demons in comics history, a hulking gothic-glam monstrosity who looks like a cross between Liberatore’s Ranx and Steve Ditko’s The Creeper.  Rather than try to get his Death book back, Ryuk views Light’s murderous schemes with a kind of bemused ambivalence.

Rather than veer into familiar teen horror, nerd revenge territory, Death Note is fairly epic in scope, as Light, mad with his newfound power, uses the book to attempt to rid the world of evil, not out of altruism, but in order to recreate the world as a Utopia with himself as “the god of the new world.”  This imaginative grandiosity is a big part of Death Note’s appeal.  The story is daring and unpredictable, sometimes absurd and humorous, other times stark and frightening.  Death Note is a fast-paced, fascinating example of the heights of creativity Manga has to offer.

[Read Death Note on comiXology]

For fans of: horror, supernatural

Harris Smith is a Brooklyn-based comics and media professional. In addition to his role as a Senior Production Coordinator at comiXology, he edits several comics anthologies, including Jeans and Felony Comics, under the banner of Negative Pleasure Publications. He’s also the host of the weekly radio show Neagtive Pleasure on Newtown Radio

A comiXologist Recommends - MANGA EDITION:
Jonah Chuang recommends Dragon Ball Z

Think of these volumes as a straight up no-nonsense version of what was already, despite its minor flaws, one of the greatest action series of all time. The sequel to Dragon Ball is about the now-adult Son Goku, alien from another planet who is sent to Earth as a baby to conquer it, but after falling in love with its people, becomes its greatest hero. Together with his friends and family, he defends the planet from overwhelming alien threats with the help of the magical Dragon Balls. 

For those of you who know the watered down animated Toonami versions from TV, these books have all of the stuff and none of the fluff. You do lose the dazzling animated fights with the manga version, but the story and character development are streamlined, and we’re treated to a better paced telling which makes the relationships feel more familiar and authentic. The manga version also includes more banter, quirkiness, and small, personal jokes that make you feel closer to the DBZ family than ever before.

Dragon Ball Z is father to many of the tropes that we love in action movies and animation today. Its treatment of flying/fighting, impact cratering, power levels, getting suped up, and the idea of taking enemies and making them regular heroes carry forward into pop culture today. It’s a classic series that feels just as fresh and interesting today as when it was first released 25 years ago.

[Read Dragon Ball Z on comiXology]

For fans of: ActionMartial ArtsHumor

Jonah Chuang is a production coordinator assistant at comixology. He has attended both The Office conventions in Scranton, PA and met Ricky Gervais last week.

A comiXologist Recommends - MANGA EDITION:
Emily Forster recommends Naruto

Ninja have seen a lot of action in comics, but no series has reimagined the idea of a “ninja” quite like Naruto. In Masashi Kishimoto’s fictional world, ninja are assigned missions ranging from pet-sitting to assassination. Naruto, an orphan with a loud mouth and a dedication to the color orange, is determined to become the most powerful ninja and win the respect of his whole village - but he doesn’t seem to have much talent. On top of that, he carries the stigma of the dreaded Nine-Tails, a demon fox of enormous elemental power that happens to be sealed inside him. Still, he won’t give up on his dream, though he soon finds himself fighting for a lot more than his own reputation.

Like other great Viz titles, Naruto is defined by the themes of friendship, teamwork, and the will to never give up. The action is fantastic - the focus on strategy and deception makes for a much more exciting read than your basic face-punching. But what really makes Naruto special is the pure heart of its characters; the kind that get under your skin until you want to cry when they’re suffering and cheer when they’re victorious.

Naruto is sometimes silly (get past Naruto’s battle with indigestion before you pass judgment) and sometimes tragic (you only have to read until Vol. 4 to know if this manga is going to give you feelings - trust me.) It’s an incredibly fun read and there’s plenty of it - dive in!

[Read Naruto on comiXology]

For fans of: Action, Martial Arts, Humor

Emily Forster is a Digital Editor at ComiXology and a cartoonist. She likes comics about food and fights to the death.