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comixology:

Let Them Eat Meat Cake!A gothic gabfest with indie darling Dame Darcyby Claire Donner
The mercurial and ethereal Dame Darcy (damedarcy) is a renowned gallery artist, writer, illustrator, animator, rock musician, clothing designer, and interior decorator to stars such as Margaret Cho and Courtney Love. In spite of this grandiose resume, her artistic career began humbly enough with an indie comic called Meat Cake. When Fantagraphics began publishing this alarming title in 1993, there was nothing truly like it on the market. Its blend of gothic literary stylings, burlesque comedy and punk zine composition made Meat Cake a critical part of the strengthening indie comics scene. 
 In the years since her entry into the indie comics canon, Dame Darcy has contributed to the Women of Marvel series, Image’s Comic Book Tattoo anthology, and Alan Moore’s Tomorrow Stories (perhaps returning the favor for Moore’s earlier guest spot in Meat Cake #9). Alongside these forays into mainstream fame, fine art and fashion, Meat Cake is fondly remembered and still going strong.
[Read Meat Cake #1 FREE for a limited time on comiXology] 
ComiXology: Which books inspired you to create something so unusual?
Dame Darcy: I read Love and Rockets when I was in High School it was my favorite. I liked how the Hernandez brothers portrayed life as a girl in such a real way, represented us in such a fair way. It was a dream come true to be published by Fantagraphics a few years later. I also loved a goth magazine called Propaganda and ordered fashion from it. Later, when I toured with (punk zine pioneer) Lisa Suckdog, after the insane rock operas, she would sell her zine and I my comic book. I also did comics for her zine, too.
 Growing up in a bohemian household exposed me to art books and styles at an early age. We also lived in a 1902 craftsman only furnished with antiques, and had a lot of books and artifacts from that era, so for me the 1980s and the 1880s blended and I didn’t quite understand that books from 100 years ago were not contemporary.
For instance, I was obsessed with the OZ book series that my Grandma had many of the original editions of…I was inspired to create my own world. The land of OZ was a utopia ruled by a little girl, Ozma, and it had a very dark side: a walking talking voodoo doll…a lady who kept hundreds of heads on stands like other women would do with wigs…a suffragette valkyrie army of flying ladies with giant sewing needles for swords and buttons for shields. When I describe the OZ book series like this, and how I lived in that world for years growing up as a child, it is no surprise Meat Cake is the way it is. 
Read More

Meat Cake #1 (still free!) for some strange strange #LateNightReads…

comixology:

Let Them Eat Meat Cake!
A gothic gabfest with indie darling Dame Darcy
by Claire Donner

The mercurial and ethereal Dame Darcy (damedarcy) is a renowned gallery artist, writer, illustrator, animator, rock musician, clothing designer, and interior decorator to stars such as Margaret Cho and Courtney Love. In spite of this grandiose resume, her artistic career began humbly enough with an indie comic called Meat Cake. When Fantagraphics began publishing this alarming title in 1993, there was nothing truly like it on the market. Its blend of gothic literary stylings, burlesque comedy and punk zine composition made Meat Cake a critical part of the strengthening indie comics scene.

 In the years since her entry into the indie comics canon, Dame Darcy has contributed to the Women of Marvel series, Image’s Comic Book Tattoo anthology, and Alan Moore’s Tomorrow Stories (perhaps returning the favor for Moore’s earlier guest spot in Meat Cake #9). Alongside these forays into mainstream fame, fine art and fashion, Meat Cake is fondly remembered and still going strong.

[Read Meat Cake #1 FREE for a limited time on comiXology

ComiXology: Which books inspired you to create something so unusual?

Dame Darcy: I read Love and Rockets when I was in High School it was my favorite. I liked how the Hernandez brothers portrayed life as a girl in such a real way, represented us in such a fair way. It was a dream come true to be published by Fantagraphics a few years later. I also loved a goth magazine called Propaganda and ordered fashion from it. Later, when I toured with (punk zine pioneer) Lisa Suckdog, after the insane rock operas, she would sell her zine and I my comic book. I also did comics for her zine, too.

 Growing up in a bohemian household exposed me to art books and styles at an early age. We also lived in a 1902 craftsman only furnished with antiques, and had a lot of books and artifacts from that era, so for me the 1980s and the 1880s blended and I didn’t quite understand that books from 100 years ago were not contemporary.

For instance, I was obsessed with the OZ book series that my Grandma had many of the original editions of…I was inspired to create my own world. The land of OZ was a utopia ruled by a little girl, Ozma, and it had a very dark side: a walking talking voodoo doll…a lady who kept hundreds of heads on stands like other women would do with wigs…a suffragette valkyrie army of flying ladies with giant sewing needles for swords and buttons for shields. When I describe the OZ book series like this, and how I lived in that world for years growing up as a child, it is no surprise Meat Cake is the way it is.

Read More

Meat Cake #1 (still free!) for some strange strange #LateNightReads

Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand takes a once-lost screenplay by Henson and turns this story he never got to tell into one of the most beautiful and mesmerizing graphic novels ever created.  Tale of Sand follows scruffy everyman, Mac, who wakes up in an unfamiliar town, and is chased across the desert of the American Southwest by all manners of man and beast of unimaginable proportions. 

Picking this up for your #LateNightReads is sure to give your subconscious something to play with while you sleep. 

For fans of: art, surrealism

[Read Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand on comiXology]

What would have happened if Kal-El’s ship had crash landed in Communist Russia instead?
In Superman: Red Son Mark Millar re-imagines a world where Kal-El dons the sickle and hammer to protect the workers utopia!
(Also Batman shows up in an awesome hat…)

A brand new edition is out today!
For fans of: Alternate History, Superman, Batman, Fan Fic
[Read Superman: Red Son on comiXology for $12.99]

What would have happened if Kal-El’s ship had crash landed in Communist Russia instead?

In Superman: Red Son Mark Millar re-imagines a world where Kal-El dons the sickle and hammer to protect the workers utopia!

(Also Batman shows up in an awesome hat…)

A brand new edition is out today!

For fans of: Alternate History, Superman, Batman, Fan Fic

[Read Superman: Red Son on comiXology for $12.99]

#LateNightReads: Harbinger

Read minds. Bend steel. Break all the rules. Teenager Pete Stanchek is out of work, on the skids, and— unbeknownst to him— a psionic-powered “harbinger” with the potential to reshape the course of human history. Toyo Harada is a wealthy business magnate, a respected philanthropist and the most powerful harbinger of all— or so he thought. As they forge an uneasy alliance, will Harada offer Pete a chance for redemption — or attempt to induct him into a secret network of conspiracy, subversion and control? Pete is about to discover that he’s not alone in the world and, soon, the generation who has nothing will take on the man who has everything.