Posts Tagged "jen keith"
A comiXologist Recommends:
Jen Keith recommends Watson & Holmes Vol. 1

“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”
-Sherlock Holmes 

Or in this case: when you have eliminated your comic to-read list, whatever remains, however good, it must be Watson and Holmes that you read next.

Modern adaptations of Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous detective, Sherlock Holmes, and the steadfast Doctor Watson are in vogue with BBC’s Sherlock and CBS’ Elementary. Karl Bollers and Rick Leonardi, with their own avant garde take, move the now African American pair from England and into Harlem, NYC for investigations into drug trafficking, kidnapping, murder, and more. 

Despite the contemporary setting and subsequent changes to what we expect from a Holmesian story, it’s still entrenched in Doyle’s writing. Many crime dramas turn into procedural cop shows; Watson and Holmes keeps us in Watson’s shoes, observing Holmes’ genius while he himself steps into the spotlight as a force to be reckoned. As a fan of the original work I’m thrilled they maintained that quintessential vantage point while giving Watson the attention he deserves. Nods to the source material are scattered throughout, so fans of any version of Holmes and the uninitiated reader alike will find an engaging mystery for all tastes. 

Leonardi’s art keeps the distinct personalities of the characters and New York City intact. I never realized I was missing a Sherlock Holmes with dreadlocks in my life, but I was. Meanwhile, Mycroft and the Baker Street Irregulars a treat, and I eagerly await more of them. 

You may be familiar with a more traditional interpretation, but I highly recommend you pick up Watson and Holmes Vol. 1 for the collected issues #1 – 5 and a breath of fresh air in these well-loved characters. After all, the game is afoot.

[Read Watson & Holmes Vol. 1 Here!]

For fans of: crime, drama, action

Jen Keith is a Digital Editor at comiXology, comic artist, music addict, and would like you to know that Holmes never said “Elementary, my dear Watson” in the original stories.

A comiXologist Recommends:
Jen Keith recommends Chicacabra

Isabel Sanchez, also known as Izzy, loves beetles and her Uncle and smoking with her friends. She doesn’t love pretending that everything is okay at her high school when her life and family were torn asunder only a short time ago. Still lost in a haze of getting along day by day while her own mother serves as a painful reminder of her loss, Izzy’s life is upturned once again as one lost girl becomes two when a chupacabra makes her its host body in Chicacabra.

Tom Beland's cartooning is simple yet so very expressive. With a few lines he's able to pull and engage you into a folklore of his own creating. The poignant scenes of familial bonding balance wonderfully with the comical moments of Izzy hulking out into a bloodthirsty creature that, despite being the stuff of horror legends, is just as endearing and clueless as the teen girl it inhabits. Chupacabras aren't just goat-sucking creatures; their myth is revived into something new and heart-wrenching.

On top of the folklore of the less-explored chupacabra and vejigante (which had a fascinating interpretation and I’d love to see a book just exploring Beland’s vejigante retelling), we’re brought to a new environment not as common in comics: Puerto Rico. The culture is as lush as the cast is emotive through Beland’s detail and specific locales, and it’s refreshing to see a different city from the usual set.

For lovers of expressive black and white comics, mythology, and finding your strength in times of loss, check out I Kill Giants for more young heroes finding their strength to conquer and, in time, accept what life throws at them. Until then, bring your love of folklore and a box of tissues with you for reading Chicacabra.

[Read Chicacabra Here!]

For fans of: female leads, POC leads, horror

Jen Keith is a Digital Editor at comiXology, comic artist, music addict, and kind of wants a chupacabra of her own now.

A comiXologist Recommends:
Jen Keith recommends Wonton Soup Omnibus

Ingredients: 
2 cups space truckers
¾ cup absurdity
½ pound of laugh out loud hilarity, finely chopped
1 teaspoon sweet romance
a pinch of space ninjas, to taste

Mix thoroughly and bake at 400 degrees of awesome in a science fiction oven and serve immediately. Enjoy your delicious Wonton Soup by James Stokoe, surely to be a favorite at your table or in your comics library.

Imagine combining Naruto and the Iron Chef into a wild sci-fi ride through an otherworldly culinary school, and you’ll have a small idea of the joy to be found in Wonton Soup. Johnny Boyo cruises the cosmos as a space trucker with his eccentric co-pilot/trucker buddy Deacon, eating his way through the tentacled oddities of space chickens and a menagerie of other bizarre ingredients. Rather than a strictly linear plot, we’re treated to a tasty variety platter of stories detailing the eccentricities of the characters, unusual cuisine via Boyo’s culinary prowess, and an odd (and often hilariously vulgar) universe.

It’s not often I have to pause while reading to give myself time to stifle my laughter, but this book had me taking a chuckle if not out right guffaw break every few pages.

Stokoe’s lively and intricate drawing style makes every panel just as entertaining as the last, complimenting the spirited action and humor. If you want more proof of the talent and sheer level of detail Stokoe is capable of, try Godzilla Half Century War.

And if you’re still hungry after that and want another generous helping of food-related comics, check out Toriko or Chew to hold you til dinner.

No matter how many comics you read this week, be sure to leave room for seconds because Wonton Soup is delicious to the last drop.

ed- Includes a foreword from royalboiler!

[Read Wonton Soup Here!]

For fans of: comedy, science fiction

Jen Keith is a Digital Editor at comiXology, comic artist, music addict, and looking forward to lunch because all of these comics are making her hungry.

A comiXologist Recommends:
Jen Keith recommends Ms. Marvel #5

Last we left Kamala was in over her head on a rescue mission that wasn’t as easy as the superheroes on the news might make it look. There’s plenty of action and questions coming our way in Ms. Marvel #5. Will Kamala save the day? Is a bathing suit really the ideal superhero costume? And just who is the Inventor?!


The thing that really makes this book for me is that Kamala is just so relatable – she’s not rich or well-trained or a natural born leader…yet. She’s learning that with great power comes great costume design difficulties, arguments with your parents, and a lot of missteps in the superhero-ing business. Just because you suddenly develop powers doesn’t mean you’ll be the cool kid at school or your parents won’t ground you. If you thought trying to figure out who you are as a non-powered teenager was hard, try doing it when you can shape shift into anybody or anything on a whim (and sometimes by accident). That’s one of the best things about Ms. Marvel: we’re seeing not only a superhero being born but a person coming into their own.

Just ask the Young Avengers – it’s not easy putting your feet into the shoes of your idols. Kamala is doing it with charm, luck, and a fair bit of help (and hindrance). Writer G. Willow Wilson (gwillow) and artist Adrian Alphona bring the diverse and entertaining cast to life to endear us to a new chapter in the Marvel universe.

You don’t have to sneak out of the house in your makeshift spandex onesie and domino mask to enjoy this series – go ahead and give Ms. Marvel a chance (she’s certainly taking plenty of her own).

[Pick up Ms. Marvel #5 here!]

For fans of: female leads, POC leads, superheroes, action

Jen Keith is a Digital Editor at comiXology, comic artist, music addict, and really excited about all of these fierce lady superhero titles she’s been reading recently.

A comiXologist Recommends:
Jen Keith recommends Saga #19

From the series that brought us Lying Cat comes the next installment of the abundantly award-winning Saga by Brian K. Vaughan and fionastaples. If you haven’t been following along, it is my duty to direct you back to issue #1; you can thank me later. For those of you keeping up with your required reading, then you already know Saga #19 will be a comic treat.

Saga is your standard boy and girl meet, fall in love, betray their own species during an inter-planetary war, and run off to have what might be the cutest child that side of the universe. Narrating this space romp through lushly designed alien worlds and cultures is said cutest child, Hazel, whose impish personality shines through the re-telling of her own childhood. In Saga #19, we find our besotted heroes/haggard parents in domestic bliss – if you can call juggling a rigid mother-in-law, a messy house pet, and a live-in ghostly baby-sitter the calming, everyday life of domesticity. Work may be tough, but your kid is cute, your spouse is gorgeous, and hopefully no assassins and/or robot princes will end up on your front lawn today.

The aptly named Saga enraptures its audience with Brian K. Vaughan’s perfect balance of poignant and comedic writing and Fiona Staples’ rich, expressive artwork. If you’re all caught up on Saga and aching for more from these two wildly talented creators, Vaughan’s Y: The Last Man and Staples’ work in The Mystery Society will hopefully hold you for now.

As in every issue, Saga and its captivating cast continues the journey across the galaxy and into our hearts.

[Pick up Saga #19 here!]

For fans of: sci-fidiverse characters, POC leads, female leads, romance, action

Jen Keith is a Digital Editor at comiXology, comic creator, music addict, and shamelessly unapologetic Green Arrow enthusiast.