Posts Tagged "indie comics"

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A comiXologist Recommends:
Michael Crowe recommends Merrick: The Sensational Elephantman #1

In Merrick: The Sensational Elephantman #1, writer Tom Ward and artist Luke Parker (la-parker-illustration) expertly handle a fictionalized take on the historical person, Joseph Merrick. Merrick first came to prominence in the 1880s as a human curiosity known as “The Elephant Man.” From an early age Merrick exhibited growth abnormalities which became progressively worse over time. Large bony growths spread across his body enlarging and deforming his right arm, both his feet and his head. Disowned by his family and unable to find traditional ways to support himself, Merrick was forced to exhibit his afflictions to make a living.

This first issue throws us into the midst of Merrick’s life as a human oddity, exploring the kind of rejection and abuse he experienced during his short and difficult life. But beneath this rather straight retelling of history lurks a dark story of mystery and the occult. The book is drawn in a style that pays homage to Mike Mignola, writer/creator of Hellboy. Not only does this choice set the tone of the larger narrative that is yet to come, it also draws interesting parallels between Merrick and Hellboy.

Ward and Parker work seamlessly to create a book that is both gorgeous and well researched. They are able to delicately weave together fact and fiction, creating a something that is respectful of Joseph Merrick. In the story, Merrick is able to not only retain, but also affirm, his own humanity and self worth despite the cruelty often inflicted on him by society. For this reason the reader is able to see Merrick as a hero unlike so many people in his time who saw him as, at best, a freak. 

[Read Merrick: The Sensational Elephantman on comiXology]

For fans of: Biography, Supernatural

Michael Crowe works in digital assets/launch by day and writes science fiction stories/fights crime by night. 

comiXology Summer Reading List Day 5: Werewolves of Montpellier

Thanks fantagraphics!

Sven, a semi-aimless Scandinavian artist who has ended up in Montpellier, France on a futile romantic pursuit, enjoys nocturnal raids into other people’s homes, disguised as a werewolf. The way he figures it, the disguise will give him an extra few moments’ advantage vis-à-vis any startled home owner if things get ugly… but he hasn’t taken into account the existence of a society of real Montpellier-based werewolves who do not take kindly to this new pretender. So while Sven spends his days playing chess and poker with his friends, sketching his way through his picturesque chosen hometown, and coping with romantic dilemmas — both his and those of his best friend, the Breakfast-at-Tiffany’s-obsessed Audrey, who has girl troubles of her own — little does he realize that a genuine threat to his life, and for that matter his humanity, is closing in on him.

Get Werewolves of Montpellier for FREE by clicking here, and make sure to follow this tumblr for more free comics to get your Summer started off right or bookmark our Summer Reading List page!

comixology:

Let Them Eat Meat Cake!
A gothic gabfest with indie darling Dame Darcy
by Claire Donner

The mercurial and ethereal Dame Darcy (damedarcy) is a renowned gallery artist, writer, illustrator, animator, rock musician, clothing designer, and interior decorator to stars such as Margaret Cho and Courtney Love. In spite of this grandiose resume, her artistic career began humbly enough with an indie comic called Meat Cake. When Fantagraphics began publishing this alarming title in 1993, there was nothing truly like it on the market. Its blend of gothic literary stylings, burlesque comedy and punk zine composition made Meat Cake a critical part of the strengthening indie comics scene.

 In the years since her entry into the indie comics canon, Dame Darcy has contributed to the Women of Marvel series, Image’s Comic Book Tattoo anthology, and Alan Moore’s Tomorrow Stories (perhaps returning the favor for Moore’s earlier guest spot in Meat Cake #9). Alongside these forays into mainstream fame, fine art and fashion, Meat Cake is fondly remembered and still going strong.

[Read Meat Cake #1 FREE for a limited time on comiXology

ComiXology: Which books inspired you to create something so unusual?

Dame Darcy: I read Love and Rockets when I was in High School it was my favorite. I liked how the Hernandez brothers portrayed life as a girl in such a real way, represented us in such a fair way. It was a dream come true to be published by Fantagraphics a few years later. I also loved a goth magazine called Propaganda and ordered fashion from it. Later, when I toured with (punk zine pioneer) Lisa Suckdog, after the insane rock operas, she would sell her zine and I my comic book. I also did comics for her zine, too.

 Growing up in a bohemian household exposed me to art books and styles at an early age. We also lived in a 1902 craftsman only furnished with antiques, and had a lot of books and artifacts from that era, so for me the 1980s and the 1880s blended and I didn’t quite understand that books from 100 years ago were not contemporary.

For instance, I was obsessed with the OZ book series that my Grandma had many of the original editions of…I was inspired to create my own world. The land of OZ was a utopia ruled by a little girl, Ozma, and it had a very dark side: a walking talking voodoo doll…a lady who kept hundreds of heads on stands like other women would do with wigs…a suffragette valkyrie army of flying ladies with giant sewing needles for swords and buttons for shields. When I describe the OZ book series like this, and how I lived in that world for years growing up as a child, it is no surprise Meat Cake is the way it is.

Read More

Meat Cake #1 (still free!) for some strange strange #LateNightReads

Let Them Eat Meat Cake!
A gothic gabfest with indie darling Dame Darcy
by Claire Donner

The mercurial and ethereal Dame Darcy (damedarcy) is a renowned gallery artist, writer, illustrator, animator, rock musician, clothing designer, and interior decorator to stars such as Margaret Cho and Courtney Love. In spite of this grandiose resume, her artistic career began humbly enough with an indie comic called Meat Cake. When Fantagraphics began publishing this alarming title in 1993, there was nothing truly like it on the market. Its blend of gothic literary stylings, burlesque comedy and punk zine composition made Meat Cake a critical part of the strengthening indie comics scene.

 In the years since her entry into the indie comics canon, Dame Darcy has contributed to the Women of Marvel series, Image’s Comic Book Tattoo anthology, and Alan Moore’s Tomorrow Stories (perhaps returning the favor for Moore’s earlier guest spot in Meat Cake #9). Alongside these forays into mainstream fame, fine art and fashion, Meat Cake is fondly remembered and still going strong.

[Read Meat Cake #1 FREE for a limited time on comiXology

ComiXology: Which books inspired you to create something so unusual?

Dame Darcy: I read Love and Rockets when I was in High School it was my favorite. I liked how the Hernandez brothers portrayed life as a girl in such a real way, represented us in such a fair way. It was a dream come true to be published by Fantagraphics a few years later. I also loved a goth magazine called Propaganda and ordered fashion from it. Later, when I toured with (punk zine pioneer) Lisa Suckdog, after the insane rock operas, she would sell her zine and I my comic book. I also did comics for her zine, too.

 Growing up in a bohemian household exposed me to art books and styles at an early age. We also lived in a 1902 craftsman only furnished with antiques, and had a lot of books and artifacts from that era, so for me the 1980s and the 1880s blended and I didn’t quite understand that books from 100 years ago were not contemporary.

For instance, I was obsessed with the OZ book series that my Grandma had many of the original editions of…I was inspired to create my own world. The land of OZ was a utopia ruled by a little girl, Ozma, and it had a very dark side: a walking talking voodoo doll…a lady who kept hundreds of heads on stands like other women would do with wigs…a suffragette valkyrie army of flying ladies with giant sewing needles for swords and buttons for shields. When I describe the OZ book series like this, and how I lived in that world for years growing up as a child, it is no surprise Meat Cake is the way it is.

Read More

A Hateful Chat with Peter Bagge
by Harris Smith

Chronicling the misadventures of disaffected malcontent Buddy Bradley, Peter Bagge’s Hate remains one of the definitive indie comics of the 1990s.  A spin-off of Bagge’s early work in Comical Funnies and Neat Stuff, Hate ran from 1990 to 2008, following shaggy-haired, foul-tempered and frequently-drunk Buddy through late adolescence in suburban New Jersey to 20-somethinghood in grunge-era Seattle and back to New Jersey for a slightly more responsible, although still unconventional, version of adulthood and family life.  Along the way, Bagge used Buddy and his surroundings to comment on, and often poke fun at, pop and counterculture trends of the time.

 In addition to Hate, Peter Bagge has the distinction of creating work for both Mad and Cracked, as well as comics for fantagraphics, DC, Marvel, Dark Horse, IDW and Drawn & Quarterly.  His recent creator-owned work includes Apocalypse Nerd, Other Lives, Reset, Everyone is Stupid Except for Me and Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story.

[Get Peter Bagge’s Hate #1 FREE for a limited time!

ComiXology: As a kid, what was your first comic book?

Peter Bagge: My VERY first one? I don’t remember! I recall becoming “aware” of all kinds of comic books — Superheroes, Harvey, Archie, etc. – from around the same time. I also most likely read a lot of them – in barbershops and such – before ever actually possessing one.

CX: At what point did you know you wanted to go into cartooning? How did you get your start?

PB: The notion always appealed to me, but I didn’t start in earnest until I was a 20-year-old art student. Discovering underground comics — especially Crumb’s — was the biggest catalyst for me.

CX: What cartoonists have inspired and influenced your work?

PB: Crumb (see above), also Charles M. Schulz, and most of the MAD artists.

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Helper Bot #0.1 by Jeff Gibbons (prettyjeff)

Helper Bot is tasked with delivering a mindfile to Bostrom Technologies while avoiding the hazards of Robot City.

Anyone else out there love robots??

[Check out Helper Bot #0.1 Here]


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Animals #1: Chickens

Chickens is a 28 page comic set in a world where animals raise humans for food. It is the story of a young hen named Marigold who struggles to keep her family together. Chickens is written by Eric Grissom (grissom) with art by Claire Connelly (thinkillustration)

What a weird and dark and strange story, I can’t wait for the next part. 


#cxsubmit: Every Wednesday we suggest to you one of our new releases from our acclaimed self-publishing platform comiXology Submit.

Werewolves of Montpellier by Jason

Named to NPR, Las Vegas Weekly, Graphic Novel Reporter, The Casual Optimist, Comic Book Resources, Attentiondeficitdisorderly, Hypergeek, and Robot 6’s Best of 2010 lists. Sven, a semi-aimless Scandinavian artist who has ended up in Montpellier, France on a futile romantic pursuit, enjoys nocturnal raids into other people’s homes, disguised as a werewolf. The way he figures it, the disguise will give him an extra few moments’ advantage vis-à-vis any startled home owner if things get ugly… but he hasn’t taken into account the existence of a society of real Montpellier-based werewolves who do not take kindly to this new pretender. So while Sven spends his days playing chess and poker with his friends, sketching his way through his picturesque chosen hometown, and coping with romantic dilemmas — both his and those of his best friend, the Breakfast-at-Tiffany’s-obsessed Audrey, who has girl troubles of her own — little does he realize that a genuine threat to his life, and for that matter his humanity, is closing in on him. Werewolves of Montpellier is a lycanthropic thriller, a romantic comedy, and an existential drama — beware the full moon!