Featured Comic of the Week!

Enter your email address below to sign up for emails!

Email Address:


Download our App >>


comiXology Unbound's #LongReads↳Black is the Color by Julia Gfrörer (doopliss)

A 17th century sailor is abandoned at sea by his shipmates, enduring both his lingering death sentence and the advances of a cruel and amorous mermaid. A delicately drawn, lyrical and darkly romantic debut graphic novella.

Julia Gfrörer’s art is all at once creepily haunting and hypnotically beautiful and perfectly fitting for this tale of a soul lost at sea. 
[Dive into Black is the Color here]
#LongReads: Every Thursday Afternoon comiXology Unbound suggests a comic to read for those who are looking for something more than 22 pages!   High-res
comiXology Unbound's #LongReads
Black is the Color by Julia Gfrörer (doopliss)

A 17th century sailor is abandoned at sea by his shipmates, enduring both his lingering death sentence and the advances of a cruel and amorous mermaid. A delicately drawn, lyrical and darkly romantic debut graphic novella.

Julia Gfrörer’s art is all at once creepily haunting and hypnotically beautiful and perfectly fitting for this tale of a soul lost at sea. 

[Dive into Black is the Color here]


#LongReads: Every Thursday Afternoon comiXology Unbound suggests a comic to read for those who are looking for something more than 22 pages!

comixology:

Let Them Eat Meat Cake!A gothic gabfest with indie darling Dame Darcyby Claire Donner
The mercurial and ethereal Dame Darcy (damedarcy) is a renowned gallery artist, writer, illustrator, animator, rock musician, clothing designer, and interior decorator to stars such as Margaret Cho and Courtney Love. In spite of this grandiose resume, her artistic career began humbly enough with an indie comic called Meat Cake. When Fantagraphics began publishing this alarming title in 1993, there was nothing truly like it on the market. Its blend of gothic literary stylings, burlesque comedy and punk zine composition made Meat Cake a critical part of the strengthening indie comics scene. 
 In the years since her entry into the indie comics canon, Dame Darcy has contributed to the Women of Marvel series, Image’s Comic Book Tattoo anthology, and Alan Moore’s Tomorrow Stories (perhaps returning the favor for Moore’s earlier guest spot in Meat Cake #9). Alongside these forays into mainstream fame, fine art and fashion, Meat Cake is fondly remembered and still going strong.
[Read Meat Cake #1 FREE for a limited time on comiXology] 
ComiXology: Which books inspired you to create something so unusual?
Dame Darcy: I read Love and Rockets when I was in High School it was my favorite. I liked how the Hernandez brothers portrayed life as a girl in such a real way, represented us in such a fair way. It was a dream come true to be published by Fantagraphics a few years later. I also loved a goth magazine called Propaganda and ordered fashion from it. Later, when I toured with (punk zine pioneer) Lisa Suckdog, after the insane rock operas, she would sell her zine and I my comic book. I also did comics for her zine, too.
 Growing up in a bohemian household exposed me to art books and styles at an early age. We also lived in a 1902 craftsman only furnished with antiques, and had a lot of books and artifacts from that era, so for me the 1980s and the 1880s blended and I didn’t quite understand that books from 100 years ago were not contemporary.
For instance, I was obsessed with the OZ book series that my Grandma had many of the original editions of…I was inspired to create my own world. The land of OZ was a utopia ruled by a little girl, Ozma, and it had a very dark side: a walking talking voodoo doll…a lady who kept hundreds of heads on stands like other women would do with wigs…a suffragette valkyrie army of flying ladies with giant sewing needles for swords and buttons for shields. When I describe the OZ book series like this, and how I lived in that world for years growing up as a child, it is no surprise Meat Cake is the way it is. 
Read More

Meat Cake #1 (still free!) for some strange strange #LateNightReads…

comixology:

Let Them Eat Meat Cake!
A gothic gabfest with indie darling Dame Darcy
by Claire Donner

The mercurial and ethereal Dame Darcy (damedarcy) is a renowned gallery artist, writer, illustrator, animator, rock musician, clothing designer, and interior decorator to stars such as Margaret Cho and Courtney Love. In spite of this grandiose resume, her artistic career began humbly enough with an indie comic called Meat Cake. When Fantagraphics began publishing this alarming title in 1993, there was nothing truly like it on the market. Its blend of gothic literary stylings, burlesque comedy and punk zine composition made Meat Cake a critical part of the strengthening indie comics scene.

 In the years since her entry into the indie comics canon, Dame Darcy has contributed to the Women of Marvel series, Image’s Comic Book Tattoo anthology, and Alan Moore’s Tomorrow Stories (perhaps returning the favor for Moore’s earlier guest spot in Meat Cake #9). Alongside these forays into mainstream fame, fine art and fashion, Meat Cake is fondly remembered and still going strong.

[Read Meat Cake #1 FREE for a limited time on comiXology

ComiXology: Which books inspired you to create something so unusual?

Dame Darcy: I read Love and Rockets when I was in High School it was my favorite. I liked how the Hernandez brothers portrayed life as a girl in such a real way, represented us in such a fair way. It was a dream come true to be published by Fantagraphics a few years later. I also loved a goth magazine called Propaganda and ordered fashion from it. Later, when I toured with (punk zine pioneer) Lisa Suckdog, after the insane rock operas, she would sell her zine and I my comic book. I also did comics for her zine, too.

 Growing up in a bohemian household exposed me to art books and styles at an early age. We also lived in a 1902 craftsman only furnished with antiques, and had a lot of books and artifacts from that era, so for me the 1980s and the 1880s blended and I didn’t quite understand that books from 100 years ago were not contemporary.

For instance, I was obsessed with the OZ book series that my Grandma had many of the original editions of…I was inspired to create my own world. The land of OZ was a utopia ruled by a little girl, Ozma, and it had a very dark side: a walking talking voodoo doll…a lady who kept hundreds of heads on stands like other women would do with wigs…a suffragette valkyrie army of flying ladies with giant sewing needles for swords and buttons for shields. When I describe the OZ book series like this, and how I lived in that world for years growing up as a child, it is no surprise Meat Cake is the way it is.

Read More

Meat Cake #1 (still free!) for some strange strange #LateNightReads

Let Them Eat Meat Cake!A gothic gabfest with indie darling Dame Darcyby Claire Donner
The mercurial and ethereal Dame Darcy (damedarcy) is a renowned gallery artist, writer, illustrator, animator, rock musician, clothing designer, and interior decorator to stars such as Margaret Cho and Courtney Love. In spite of this grandiose resume, her artistic career began humbly enough with an indie comic called Meat Cake. When Fantagraphics began publishing this alarming title in 1993, there was nothing truly like it on the market. Its blend of gothic literary stylings, burlesque comedy and punk zine composition made Meat Cake a critical part of the strengthening indie comics scene. 
 In the years since her entry into the indie comics canon, Dame Darcy has contributed to the Women of Marvel series, Image’s Comic Book Tattoo anthology, and Alan Moore’s Tomorrow Stories (perhaps returning the favor for Moore’s earlier guest spot in Meat Cake #9). Alongside these forays into mainstream fame, fine art and fashion, Meat Cake is fondly remembered and still going strong.
[Read Meat Cake #1 FREE for a limited time on comiXology] 

ComiXology: Which books inspired you to create something so unusual?
Dame Darcy: I read Love and Rockets when I was in High School it was my favorite. I liked how the Hernandez brothers portrayed life as a girl in such a real way, represented us in such a fair way. It was a dream come true to be published by Fantagraphics a few years later. I also loved a goth magazine called Propaganda and ordered fashion from it. Later, when I toured with (punk zine pioneer) Lisa Suckdog, after the insane rock operas, she would sell her zine and I my comic book. I also did comics for her zine, too.
 Growing up in a bohemian household exposed me to art books and styles at an early age. We also lived in a 1902 craftsman only furnished with antiques, and had a lot of books and artifacts from that era, so for me the 1980s and the 1880s blended and I didn’t quite understand that books from 100 years ago were not contemporary.
For instance, I was obsessed with the OZ book series that my Grandma had many of the original editions of…I was inspired to create my own world. The land of OZ was a utopia ruled by a little girl, Ozma, and it had a very dark side: a walking talking voodoo doll…a lady who kept hundreds of heads on stands like other women would do with wigs…a suffragette valkyrie army of flying ladies with giant sewing needles for swords and buttons for shields. When I describe the OZ book series like this, and how I lived in that world for years growing up as a child, it is no surprise Meat Cake is the way it is. 
[[MORE]]
CX: It’s clear that Meat Cake takes cues from many different media aside from other cartoons and comics. What are some of these fine art influences?
DD: I love Aubrey Beardsley, Edward Gorey, silent film stars, fairy tales, Klimt, the Pre-Raphaelites, the poetry of Poe and Bronte and so many others from the turn of the century. Twain, and Austen, and the easy-eating-like-vampire-bon bons amazingness of VC Andrews and Anne Rice.
CX: What are your favorite tools for creating the unique look of Meat Cake? 
DD: My favorite for years was a red nib Rapidograph pen and a grey nib, switched out…I used to map everything out with a pencil first, but now I work with an awesome refillable pen my dad gave me for my birthday last year called Lamy, and the ink is Noodlers ink, it apparently is a formula some obsessive guy makes in the northwest…I also draw more directly with the pen straight to paper, taking out more of the pencil sketch step for time efficiency. I follow story boards I draw in another book, and I’m in the process of learning photoshop better – I have to thank my wonderful interns Tasha and Jessica for that.
 CX: Readers remember Meat Cake mainly for its special aesthetic, but you’ve also created some unforgettable characters. How do you come up with someone like Strega Pez, a witch who communicates through engraved tablets that pop out of her neck?
DD: I like to play with the concepts of word balloons. Who says they have to be the conventional style? I had an Easter bunny Pez dispenser and I thought, “What if this was a witch, and her thought balloons were written on the Pez? What would be her back story? That she was cursed to only talk this way.” Strega Pez is, in theory, handicapped by this. So, at first she was only able to work minimum wage day jobs like at a clam shack. But she worked extra hard to become a scientist and, through chemistry, combined spider silk with goats milk to invent an incredibly strong invisible string. Because she owns the patent, she is now rich.
CX: Goths get a bad rap for being too serious, but the quintessentially gothic Meat Cake is incredibly funny. Your comics also seem to owe a lot to bawdy cartoonists like Tex Avery. Do you feel a kinship with a lot of comedic creators?
DD: As a young goth, I loved how Tim Burton made Beetlejuice so wacky and hilarious, though it was also soooo goth. That movie really influenced and inspired me at the age of 16 when I saw it at the Idaho Falls drive in. I couldn’t wait to get out into the big world and become part of the mainstream market for my kind of ideas that Tim had shown me was there. 
Dark humor is the best because this world is a very dark place, and this kind of humor points out the truths, or makes light of all that darkness. I think it makes me feel better, and I feel many people share in this view as well. Although I always was super goth I thought it was boring, dumb, trite, and self absorbed to take anything too seriously. I practice Buddhism now, and have for over 10 years. There is a philosophy about “the pain body” where you are supposed to separate yourself from it, look at it objectively and not get too wrapped up in it and absorbed by it. I think without knowing it, this is what I was doing through my humor. 
Oh and yes, I love Tex Avery, especially that psychedelic wolf who goes bonkers when he sees Red Riding Hood – like, his jaw drops and turns into a staircase and his eyes fall out and bounce down it. I also LOVE me up some of those Betty Boop cartoons from the 1920’s. Sooooo crazy and trippy and dark. Betty Boop was based on silent film star Clara Bow, you know. 
CX: Speaking of stars, your persona outlives Meat Cake in many ways – you are something of a fashion innovator, designing and creating your own dolls and flaunting your unique style at events like the Mermaid Parade. Can you talk a bit about your relationship to fashion?   
DD: It was very weird and lonely in the 90’s because I didn’t consider myself just goth, I wore pink, frilly fairytale fantasy-style dresses a lot. I was lolita before lolita was a (fashion world) thing, and I’m so glad that Meat Cake and the style of the girls has become more timely and of the moment now than it was 20 years ago with the advent of the lolita movement. I’ve begun creating a game with the ladies who are coordinating Ruffle Con, the first Lolita Convention starting in New Haven CT this October. Now I’m the Lolita Granny, and it is my wish to show the Lolitas I truly understand them through Meat Cake. We can all have fun, fantasy and fashion throughout history, from rococo to Victorian to the 20’s and now beyond. 
Claire Donner is a blogger, game critic and comics creator who earned her Art History degree from Bard College for her work on R. Crumb. She has contributed interviews with Gilbert Hernandez and Richard Sala to comiXology, and she hopes to see this list continue to grow in the future.
Let Them Eat Meat Cake!
A gothic gabfest with indie darling Dame Darcy
by Claire Donner

The mercurial and ethereal Dame Darcy (damedarcy) is a renowned gallery artist, writer, illustrator, animator, rock musician, clothing designer, and interior decorator to stars such as Margaret Cho and Courtney Love. In spite of this grandiose resume, her artistic career began humbly enough with an indie comic called Meat Cake. When Fantagraphics began publishing this alarming title in 1993, there was nothing truly like it on the market. Its blend of gothic literary stylings, burlesque comedy and punk zine composition made Meat Cake a critical part of the strengthening indie comics scene.

 In the years since her entry into the indie comics canon, Dame Darcy has contributed to the Women of Marvel series, Image’s Comic Book Tattoo anthology, and Alan Moore’s Tomorrow Stories (perhaps returning the favor for Moore’s earlier guest spot in Meat Cake #9). Alongside these forays into mainstream fame, fine art and fashion, Meat Cake is fondly remembered and still going strong.

[Read Meat Cake #1 FREE for a limited time on comiXology

ComiXology: Which books inspired you to create something so unusual?

Dame Darcy: I read Love and Rockets when I was in High School it was my favorite. I liked how the Hernandez brothers portrayed life as a girl in such a real way, represented us in such a fair way. It was a dream come true to be published by Fantagraphics a few years later. I also loved a goth magazine called Propaganda and ordered fashion from it. Later, when I toured with (punk zine pioneer) Lisa Suckdog, after the insane rock operas, she would sell her zine and I my comic book. I also did comics for her zine, too.

 Growing up in a bohemian household exposed me to art books and styles at an early age. We also lived in a 1902 craftsman only furnished with antiques, and had a lot of books and artifacts from that era, so for me the 1980s and the 1880s blended and I didn’t quite understand that books from 100 years ago were not contemporary.

For instance, I was obsessed with the OZ book series that my Grandma had many of the original editions of…I was inspired to create my own world. The land of OZ was a utopia ruled by a little girl, Ozma, and it had a very dark side: a walking talking voodoo doll…a lady who kept hundreds of heads on stands like other women would do with wigs…a suffragette valkyrie army of flying ladies with giant sewing needles for swords and buttons for shields. When I describe the OZ book series like this, and how I lived in that world for years growing up as a child, it is no surprise Meat Cake is the way it is.

Read More

A Hateful Chat with Peter Baggeby Harris Smith
Chronicling the misadventures of disaffected malcontent Buddy Bradley, Peter Bagge’s Hate remains one of the definitive indie comics of the 1990s.  A spin-off of Bagge’s early work in Comical Funnies and Neat Stuff, Hate ran from 1990 to 2008, following shaggy-haired, foul-tempered and frequently-drunk Buddy through late adolescence in suburban New Jersey to 20-somethinghood in grunge-era Seattle and back to New Jersey for a slightly more responsible, although still unconventional, version of adulthood and family life.  Along the way, Bagge used Buddy and his surroundings to comment on, and often poke fun at, pop and counterculture trends of the time.
 In addition to Hate, Peter Bagge has the distinction of creating work for both Mad and Cracked, as well as comics for fantagraphics, DC, Marvel, Dark Horse, IDW and Drawn & Quarterly.  His recent creator-owned work includes Apocalypse Nerd, Other Lives, Reset, Everyone is Stupid Except for Me and Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story.
[Get Peter Bagge’s Hate #1 FREE for a limited time!] 

ComiXology: As a kid, what was your first comic book?
Peter Bagge: My VERY first one? I don’t remember! I recall becoming “aware” of all kinds of comic books — Superheroes, Harvey, Archie, etc. – from around the same time. I also most likely read a lot of them – in barbershops and such – before ever actually possessing one.CX: At what point did you know you wanted to go into cartooning? How did you get your start? PB: The notion always appealed to me, but I didn’t start in earnest until I was a 20-year-old art student. Discovering underground comics — especially Crumb’s — was the biggest catalyst for me. CX: What cartoonists have inspired and influenced your work? PB: Crumb (see above), also Charles M. Schulz, and most of the MAD artists.
[[MORE]]
CX: What made you decide to spin off the Bradleys from Neat Stuff, and what made you decide to focus Hate specifically on Buddy? What was the inspiration for that character? Were there a lot of elements of yourself in Buddy? PB: Yes to the last question.  I related to him the most — thus I had more story ideas for him than any of my other characters.  It seemed only natural to have him “take over.” CX: In addition to Buddy, Hate had a very rich and varied supporting cast. What were your inspirations for the other characters in Buddy’s world? PB: They’re ALL based on people I know in real life, to various degrees. CX: Hate was very much a comic of its time. Could you talk about the cultural atmosphere you were drawing upon while making the series in the 1990s? PB: For me it was actually a nostalgic endeavor, in that it was simply an updated version of my own past.  I was writing about what happened to me in the 1970s and ’80s, so it’s kind of ironic that it became such a defining “‘90s” comic! CX: Unlike more mainstream comic book characters, where changes over time are largely superficial, but the basic character is expected to stay largely the same, Buddy went through a lot of really serious changes over the course of Hate, moving from Jersey to Seattle and back to Jersey, going through a variety of careers and relationships, eventually getting married and settling down. More than that, though, as his character changes, we really see him grow and mature over the years. What was the inspiration for the changes in Buddy’s life? Did they correspond with what was going on in your life at the time you were making the comics? PB: Buddy always has been a roughly 10 years younger version of myself.  I think of what I was going through 10 years ago and more or less start from there.  Though the differences between us are obvious — I never owned a 2nd hand shop or scrap metal junkyard, for one thing.  And he never was a cartoonist! CX: What made you decide to end Hate? For a while we were getting Annuals, but those seem to have ended as well. Will there ever be more Buddy Bradley stories? PB: There’s a new Buddy story in the soon-to-be-released BUDDY BUYS A DUMP collection.  After that, who knows.  Buddy had to take a back seat after a while to my many other (and more lucrative) projects. CX: Hate Annual #8 is one of the funniest comics ever written. Where did the idea for that one come from? PB: Thanks!  Well, I had reached an age where I knew more people in “behind the scenes” positions in the music biz, rather than just musicians themselves.  And I found their stories and their own shenanigans quite amusing.  I had to use those stories for something! CX: How would you say your more recent work, like Apocalypse Nerd and Other Lives, differs from your earlier work? PB: They’re actual NOVELS, for one thing.  Thinking in such a long form format makes them quite different animals from the get-go.  And all of my work is more subdued and, well, mature than my earlier work was.  An inevitable transition, I’m sure. CX: You’ve done work for a lot of publishers over the years. What kinds of experiences have you had working for Mad, Cracked, DC and Marvel? How does this differ from publishing with Fantagraphics? PB: Almost all the work I did for the folks you listed were was and is work-for-hire. That alone makes it drastically different from the work I do for Fantagraphics or Dark Horse or D&Q.  Everything is more cut and dried: they’re more specific as to what they want from me, and the checks tend to be bigger and arrive sooner.  I’ve had some inexplicable dealings with both Marvel and DC, but I think I’m fortunate that I never pinned any great hopes on working for them.  It never was a dream of mine, in other words.  Thus I never felt particularly devastated when titles of mine got canceled or held up by them. CX: What’s next for Peter Bagge? PB: Another bio comic for D&Q — this time about Zora Neale Hurston.

Harris Smith is a Brooklyn-based comics and media professional.  In addition to his role as a Senior Production Coordinator at comiXology, he edits several comics anthologies under the banner of Negative Pleasure Publications. He’s also the host of the weekly radio show Neagtive Pleasure.   High-res
A Hateful Chat with Peter Bagge
by Harris Smith

Chronicling the misadventures of disaffected malcontent Buddy Bradley, Peter Bagge’s Hate remains one of the definitive indie comics of the 1990s.  A spin-off of Bagge’s early work in Comical Funnies and Neat Stuff, Hate ran from 1990 to 2008, following shaggy-haired, foul-tempered and frequently-drunk Buddy through late adolescence in suburban New Jersey to 20-somethinghood in grunge-era Seattle and back to New Jersey for a slightly more responsible, although still unconventional, version of adulthood and family life.  Along the way, Bagge used Buddy and his surroundings to comment on, and often poke fun at, pop and counterculture trends of the time.

 In addition to Hate, Peter Bagge has the distinction of creating work for both Mad and Cracked, as well as comics for fantagraphics, DC, Marvel, Dark Horse, IDW and Drawn & Quarterly.  His recent creator-owned work includes Apocalypse Nerd, Other Lives, Reset, Everyone is Stupid Except for Me and Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story.

[Get Peter Bagge’s Hate #1 FREE for a limited time!

ComiXology: As a kid, what was your first comic book?

Peter Bagge: My VERY first one? I don’t remember! I recall becoming “aware” of all kinds of comic books — Superheroes, Harvey, Archie, etc. – from around the same time. I also most likely read a lot of them – in barbershops and such – before ever actually possessing one.

CX: At what point did you know you wanted to go into cartooning? How did you get your start?

PB: The notion always appealed to me, but I didn’t start in earnest until I was a 20-year-old art student. Discovering underground comics — especially Crumb’s — was the biggest catalyst for me.

CX: What cartoonists have inspired and influenced your work?

PB: Crumb (see above), also Charles M. Schulz, and most of the MAD artists.

Read More

Fantagraphics Books Digitally Debuts Peter Bagge’s Hate & Dame Darcy’s Meat Cake On ComiXology Today

Two classic series now available digitally for the first time ever on comiXology

First issue of Hate and Meat Cake FREE for limited time!

April 9th, 2014 – Seattle, WA / New York, NY – Fantagraphics Books, publishers of the world’s greatest cartoonists, and comiXology, the revolutionary cloud-based digital comics platform, today digitally debuted two fan-favorite comic series: Peter Bagge’s Hate and Dame Darcy’s Meat Cake. The first 10 issues of Peter Bagge’s Hate and the first 7 issues of Dame Darcy’s Meat Cake are available now across comiXology’s entire platform including iPad, iPhone, Android, Kindle Fire, Windows 8 and the Web at www.comixology.com.

To celebrate these great additions to the comiXology platform both Hate #1 and Meat Cake #1 are available completely free for a limited time only!

Read More!

thatswhatshanesaid:

Read This || Listen to That

TEOTFW is our pick for tonight’s Late Night Read! 

TEotFW follows James and Alyssa, two teenagers living a seemingly typical teen experience as they face the fear of coming adulthood. Forsman tells their story through each character’s perspective, jumping between points of view with each chapter. But quickly, this somewhat familiar teenage experience takes a more nihilistic turn as James’s character exhibits a rapidly forming sociopathy that threatens both of their futures. He harbors violent fantasies and begins to act on them, while Alyssa remains as willfully ignorant for as long as she can, blinded by young love. Forsman’s story highlights the disdain, fear and existential search that many teenagers fear, but through a road trip drama that owes as much to Badlands as The Catcher in the Rye.

[Grab TEOTFW here]

(via comixology)

Werewolves of Montpellier by Jason

Named to NPR, Las Vegas Weekly, Graphic Novel Reporter, The Casual Optimist, Comic Book Resources, Attentiondeficitdisorderly, Hypergeek, and Robot 6’s Best of 2010 lists. Sven, a semi-aimless Scandinavian artist who has ended up in Montpellier, France on a futile romantic pursuit, enjoys nocturnal raids into other people’s homes, disguised as a werewolf. The way he figures it, the disguise will give him an extra few moments’ advantage vis-à-vis any startled home owner if things get ugly… but he hasn’t taken into account the existence of a society of real Montpellier-based werewolves who do not take kindly to this new pretender. So while Sven spends his days playing chess and poker with his friends, sketching his way through his picturesque chosen hometown, and coping with romantic dilemmas — both his and those of his best friend, the Breakfast-at-Tiffany’s-obsessed Audrey, who has girl troubles of her own — little does he realize that a genuine threat to his life, and for that matter his humanity, is closing in on him. Werewolves of Montpellier is a lycanthropic thriller, a romantic comedy, and an existential drama — beware the full moon! 
  High-res

Werewolves of Montpellier by Jason

Named to NPR, Las Vegas Weekly, Graphic Novel Reporter, The Casual Optimist, Comic Book Resources, Attentiondeficitdisorderly, Hypergeek, and Robot 6’s Best of 2010 lists. Sven, a semi-aimless Scandinavian artist who has ended up in Montpellier, France on a futile romantic pursuit, enjoys nocturnal raids into other people’s homes, disguised as a werewolf. The way he figures it, the disguise will give him an extra few moments’ advantage vis-à-vis any startled home owner if things get ugly… but he hasn’t taken into account the existence of a society of real Montpellier-based werewolves who do not take kindly to this new pretender. So while Sven spends his days playing chess and poker with his friends, sketching his way through his picturesque chosen hometown, and coping with romantic dilemmas — both his and those of his best friend, the Breakfast-at-Tiffany’s-obsessed Audrey, who has girl troubles of her own — little does he realize that a genuine threat to his life, and for that matter his humanity, is closing in on him. Werewolves of Montpellier is a lycanthropic thriller, a romantic comedy, and an existential drama — beware the full moon! 

Today is the last day to take advantage of our Jason Sale. 

Check it out if you’re into indie slice of life comics. These are some of the best Fanatgraphics has to offer!

I Killed Adolf Hitler = $9.99 $4.99

In this full-color graphic novel, Jason posits a strange, violent world in which contract killers can be hired to rub out pests, be they dysfunctional relatives, abusive co-workers, loud neighbors, or just annoyances in general— and as you might imagine, their services are in heavy demand. One such killer is given the unique job of traveling back in time to kill Adolf Hitler in 1939… but things go spectacularly wrong. Hitler overpowers the would-be assassin and sends himself to the present, leaving the killer stranded in the past. The killer eventually finds his way back to the present by simply waiting the decades out as he ages, and teams up with his now much-younger girlfriend to track down the missing fascist dictator… at which point the book veers further into Jason territory, as the cartoonist’s minimalist, wickedly dry sense of humor slows down the story to a crawl: for long patches absolutely nothing happens, but nobody can make nothing happening as riotously entertaining as Jason does… and finally, when the reader isn’t paying attention, he brings it together with a shocking, perfectly logical and yet completely unexpected climax which also solves a mystery from the very beginning of the book the reader had forgotten about. As always, I Killed Adolf Hitler is rendered in Jason’s crisp deadpan neo-clear-line style, once again augmented by lovely, understated coloring.

Werewolves of Montpellier = $9.99 $4.99

Named to NPR, Las Vegas Weekly, Graphic Novel Reporter, The Casual Optimist, Comic Book Resources, Attentiondeficitdisorderly, Hypergeek, and Robot 6’s Best of 2010 lists. Sven, a semi-aimless Scandinavian artist who has ended up in Montpellier, France on a futile romantic pursuit, enjoys nocturnal raids into other people’s homes, disguised as a werewolf. The way he figures it, the disguise will give him an extra few moments’ advantage vis-à-vis any startled home owner if things get ugly… but he hasn’t taken into account the existence of a society of real Montpellier-based werewolves who do not take kindly to this new pretender. So while Sven spends his days playing chess and poker with his friends, sketching his way through his picturesque chosen hometown, and coping with romantic dilemmas — both his and those of his best friend, the Breakfast-at-Tiffany’s-obsessed Audrey, who has girl troubles of her own — little does he realize that a genuine threat to his life, and for that matter his humanity, is closing in on him. Werewolves of Montpellier is a lycanthropic thriller, a romantic comedy, and an existential drama — beware the full moon! 


Lost Cat = $17.99 $9.99

The new graphic novel by Jason is both a playful take on the classic detective story. A detective happens to find a lost cat and finds that he and the woman to whom he returns it have a lot in common. They agree to meet again… but she’s disappeared. Isolation and memory intertwine in the longest story by Jason to date.