Posts Tagged "action"
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Kate Kasenow recommends Bob's Burgers #1

The announcement of any new series comes with a lot of emotions—usually various combinations of trepidation and excitement, but I can tell you from personal experience that the announcement that the hit comedy cartoon, Bob’s Burgers, would be getting a comics adaptation made my day like an infamous Meatsiah burger!

Created by the writers and animators of the cartoon, Bob’s Burgers #1 delights with five brand new short stories about the Belcher family and their non-stop shenanigans. Journey into adventure with the Equestranauts during a glimpse of Tina’s Erotic Friend Fiction! Explore the pun-derful creative process of Bob in Burger of the Day Ideas! A dark and terrible secret awaits in Louise’s UnSolved Mysteries and Curious Curiosities! Relax and unwind with Letters from Linda! Sing along in Gene Belcher Presents!

The world of Bob’s Burgers jumps from screen to page effortlessly and will have you inappropriately snorting with laughter in no time. My personal fave will probably always be Tina’s deadpan delivery, but a close second is Louise’s passionate conviction—which might not always be right, but is most certainly one hell of a ride.

If you’ve been wondering how you’re going to make it through without any new Bob’s Burgers until October, wonder no more!

[Pick up Bob’s Burgers #1 here!]

For fans of: comedy, action, mystery, musicals, and burgers

Kate Kasenow is a comics artist from Indiana currently living in Manhattan. She works at ComiXology as a Lead Digital Editor and spends most of her spare time re-reading J. R. R. Tolkien.

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Kate Kasenow recommends Moon Knight #6

Continuing a long-running streak of brilliant reboots, the newest series of Moon Knight does not disappoint! While issue #6 is the finale of the current creative team, it invigorates the story of Mr. Knight and passes on a truly impeccable story unto the next.

In this issue, we are not lead by Moon Knight at all, but the tragic rise of a would-be antagonist. The plot of this issue really drives forward the idea that as not all heroes are created equal neither are villains and sometimes the best of intentions can lead to the wost of consequences. The character of Moon Knight, especially during this current series, is rife with both personal and psychological issues. The exploration of these issues from both sides—from the perspectives of both protagonist and antagonist, is what makes this series truly shine.

Behind these perspectives, is the seasoned writer Warren Ellis, who’s sparse style really packs a punch—sometimes literally. His characters are often reserved until their thoughts have marinated enough to let the words flow freely, but when they do the story rolls along with them. Each character is full of depth that allows them to exist fully in the dark underworld that Ellis paints with his writing. Backing up Ellis’ words is the fantastic art of Declan Shalvey (dshalv) with colors by Jordie Bellaire (jordiecolorsthings). The mood of the colors is always pitch-perfect and Shalvey’s lines move effortlessly across the page, each one laid out with an incredible sense of design.

This issue is the swan song of an incredible team and isn’t to be missed!

[Read Moon Knight #6 on comiXology!]

For fans of: superheroes, crime, mystery, action

Kate Kasenow is a comics artist from Indiana currently living in Manhattan. She works at ComiXology as a Lead Digital Editor and spends most of her spare time re-reading J. R. R. Tolkien.

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Hanni Brosh recommends Steven Universe #1

They… ARE the Crystal Gems!

They being the stoic Garnet, sassy Amethyst, fretful Pearl, and Steven, our young hero with a golden heart and a gemstone belly button. Steven Universe, created by rebeccasugar, is the latest animated series to make the jump to the comic page, joining Adventure Time and Bee and Puppycat in BOOM’s impressive cartoon lineup. 

Steven balances being a magical Crystal Gem and a regular human boy - a protector of the universe who is still a fun-loving, energetic kid. While his fellow Gems are neutralizing unsavory creatures, Steven keeps their spirits up with his optimistic attitude (and some wacky yesteryear sunglasses). Writer jeremysorese and artist colemanengle make up the main story team and their debut issue is a hit; Sorese captures small character moments among the chaos of battle (notably Amethyst and Pearl’s bickering), while Engle’s bold brushwork and bright colors bring a gaseous rainbow beast to life and send it whizzing through magnificent temple ruins. Three back-up stories round out the issue - an adventure with some side characters, a hot dog recipe, and a charming attempt at birthday cake baking.

Steven Universe is a delight for readers of all ages - rich in creative locales, thoughtfully realized characters, and a good dose of magically-charged brawling. The first issue sets a high mark for the ongoing series, making “Steven” a comic you can believe in!

[Pick up Steven Universe #1 here!]

For fans of: comedy, action

Hanni Brosh is a digital editor at comiXology. She draws comics and has a really cute dog.

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Jen Keith recommends Watson & Holmes Vol. 1

“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”
-Sherlock Holmes 

Or in this case: when you have eliminated your comic to-read list, whatever remains, however good, it must be Watson and Holmes that you read next.

Modern adaptations of Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous detective, Sherlock Holmes, and the steadfast Doctor Watson are in vogue with BBC’s Sherlock and CBS’ Elementary. Karl Bollers and Rick Leonardi, with their own avant garde take, move the now African American pair from England and into Harlem, NYC for investigations into drug trafficking, kidnapping, murder, and more. 

Despite the contemporary setting and subsequent changes to what we expect from a Holmesian story, it’s still entrenched in Doyle’s writing. Many crime dramas turn into procedural cop shows; Watson and Holmes keeps us in Watson’s shoes, observing Holmes’ genius while he himself steps into the spotlight as a force to be reckoned. As a fan of the original work I’m thrilled they maintained that quintessential vantage point while giving Watson the attention he deserves. Nods to the source material are scattered throughout, so fans of any version of Holmes and the uninitiated reader alike will find an engaging mystery for all tastes. 

Leonardi’s art keeps the distinct personalities of the characters and New York City intact. I never realized I was missing a Sherlock Holmes with dreadlocks in my life, but I was. Meanwhile, Mycroft and the Baker Street Irregulars a treat, and I eagerly await more of them. 

You may be familiar with a more traditional interpretation, but I highly recommend you pick up Watson and Holmes Vol. 1 for the collected issues #1 – 5 and a breath of fresh air in these well-loved characters. After all, the game is afoot.

[Read Watson & Holmes Vol. 1 Here!]

For fans of: crime, drama, action

Jen Keith is a Digital Editor at comiXology, comic artist, music addict, and would like you to know that Holmes never said “Elementary, my dear Watson” in the original stories.

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Mike Isenberg recommends Dark Engine #1

Written by Ryan Burton and illustrated by John Bivens, Dark Engine #1 is a fantastically weird, gory, and beautiful romp through a strange alien world.

The story features a female warrior named Sym, created by alchemists to travel back in time and defeat the evil that plagues them in the past like some sort of berzerk lady Terminator.  But the source of Sym’s power, the alchemical Dark Engine implanted deep within her, is unpredictable, and the outcome of her mission is far from certain.

Issue #1 plunges us directly into the deep end of the strange world that Burton and Bivens have created.  The book introduces the setting and a few characters, but this place is weird, and very little is explained directly to the reader.  Instead we are left to piece together the what, when, and why from context and a few snippets of dialogue.

Between those few dialogue scenes are a number of gorgeously rendered action sequences, mostly concerning Sym cutting her way through dinosaurs and monsters, covering herself with blood and viscera along the way.  Bivens executes these beautifully, with a rough-yet-purposeful brush style that evokes the work of artists like Paul Pope and Nathan Fox.

The near-impenetrable weirdness of Dark Engine’s setting gives it a plapable sense of alienation and danger.  That so little is explained directly to us only serves to make the world feel more real and alive.  Fans of Brandon Graham’s (royalboiler) excellent Prophet revival will feel right at home here.  Dark Engine #1 leaves us with a lot of questions, but it takes us on a wonderfully trippy ride along the way.  Definitely worth checking out!

[Read Dark Engine #1 Here!]

For fans of: sci-fisupernatural, action

Mike Isenberg is an Associate Production Coordinator at comiXology, and the co-writer of FIRST LAW OF MAD SCIENCE.  He lives in Harlem with his cats, TESLA AND EDISON

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Michael Crowe recommends Spider-Man 2099 #1

The Spider-man of 2099 has found himself stranded in the present…with no way home. What’s a spider to do 85 years away from home? Fight vintage crime, of course! Miguel O’Hara is now more determined than ever to preserve the safety of the future by defending it’s past. But with present day challenges and future threats slipping through the timestream, that’s easier said than done.

Spider-man 2099 #1, written by Peter David, is a perfect reintroduction of a fan favorite character. This issue, part slice of life and part superheroics, follows Miguel as he adjusts to his new life in this time period. The writer is able to forge a very clear voice and identity for Miguel; distinct from the countless other heroes who have worn the red and blue. He also introduces us to a sassy new character, Tempest, who may surprisingly prove to be the first friendly face in an unfamiliar time. The art, by Will Sliney (wsliney), is emotive and dynamic. It also manages to capture a true New York City vibe, reminding readers that the city is as much of a character as any person in the book. The colors, done by Antonio Fabela, compliment the art and add a warmth and vibrancy to the characters and backgrounds; the colors pop and glow.

To find out how Miguel got his extraordinary powers check out Spider-man 2099 Vol. 1, first published all the way back in 1992! Then pick up Superior #17, 18 and 19 to see how he ended up a Spider-man out of time.

[Read Spider-Man 2099 #1 on comiXology]

For fans of: ActionSuperheroes

Michael Crowe works on the digital assets/launch team by day and writes comics and prose by night. He’s an avid consumer of comics and all things sci-fi.

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Jonah Chuang recommends Grayson #1

Dick Grayson is dead to the world but alive in our hearts and in this book. As evidenced by the title, Dick has dropped his bird-themed moniker and ventured out on his own. Following the events of Forever Evil, the former Robin/former Nightwing has had his secret identity revealed to the world and as a result, has been forced to be reborn as a secret agent for the mysterious group, Spyral.

When I first heard about this switch, I was disappointed. I thought Nightwing had the second coolest costume of the Bat-family (next to Batwoman) and Dick Grayson was one of the most interesting characters both in and out of costume. However, I’ll admit that this new direction does feel fresh, and proves that Dick’s strong enough to step out of Batman’s shadow.

Grayson is also an excellent title for this book. Sometimes I forget that Nightwing’s “powers” come from him being an amazing physical specimen. For the most part, we only ever see him doing incredible maneuvers in costume, and his acrobatic and martial arts abilities seem like a factor of his suit and gadgets, but seeing Dick channel his inner James Bond really reminds you of the human factor in Gotham’s heroes.

Perhaps my favorite aspect of this book is the supporting cast. Without ruining too much, in this first issue, we’re treated to some pretty spectacular appearances. We get to meet Spyral, one of the trippiest characters I’ve encountered in recent history, then see our hero face off against one very deadly hero from one of DC’s other titles, and finally we see the New 52 debut of a fan favorite pre-Flashpoint heroine.

Grayson #1’s not to be missed!

[Read Grayson #1 on comiXology]

is a Production Coordinator Assistant at comiXology. His favorite Mikaelson brother is Elijah.

For fans of: action, superheroes, espionage

Jonah Chuang is a Production Coordinator Assistant at comiXology. His favorite Mikaelson brother is Elijah.

A comiXologist Recommends:
Mike Isenberg recommends The Life After #1

Is your life bland and repetitive?  Do you find yourself in a monotonous cycle of unsatisfying experiences?  You might be dead.

The Life After—by joshfialkov and Gabo (galvo) —is a comic about a very boring afterlife.  The book itself, however, is anything but.

The book’s protagonist is a man named Jude who seems to be sleepwalking through life.  Every morning he wakes up on his couch, takes a bus through heavy traffic to a mind-numbing job, busses home, and passes out on his couch in front of his TV.  Everything in his world is mildly uncomfortable, unsatisfying, and bland.  And it’s all on an endless loop.

Until one day he gets off his bus early and does something that nobody has done in two thousand years.

It’s hard to say too much about issue #1 without spoiling things.  “Things are not as they seem,” as the cliché goes, and the opening chapter of The Life After is mostly concerned with Jude trying to piece together what’s going on.  The mystery is compelling, though, and the literary figure that turns up towards the end to play Virgil to Jude’s Dante has me excited to see where this series will be headed.

Be warned that this book is dark.  The Life After #1 deals quite a bit with suicide and the experiences that might drive a person to that point.  Some of the scenes are downright grisly.  But if you’re up for a dark, weird, and mysterious supernatural tale, this comic will absolutely scratch that itch.  For a book about the dead, The Life After definitely has some life in it.

[Read The Life After #1 Here!]

For fans of: actionsupernatural

Mike Isenberg is an Associate Production Coordinator at comiXology, and the co-writer of FIRST LAW OF MAD SCIENCE.  He lives in Harlem with his cats, TESLA AND EDISON

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Kate Kasenow recommends The Woods #3

In the first two issues, new and original BOOM! Studios’ series The Woods established itself as the perfect storm of apocalyptic high school adventures in sci-fi horror. If that phrasing alone seems a bit intense for you, then you’d better fasten your seatbelts, because issue #3 is one wild ride.

Despite what the faculty and staff seem to think, things are looking grim for the students of Bay Point Prepartory Academy. After getting mysteriously transported to another world, the principal is daydreaming while the athletics department is turning the school into the dystopian setting of 1984. Meanwhile, Adrian Roth is fighting over control of a ragtag group of students with Sanami Ota. Both have powerful ideas about what needs to be done, but, unfortunately, so does everyone else.

Underneath the fantastic setting and lurking horrors of the plot, the story is essentially a diverse set of character studies. Writer James Tynion IV (jamesthefourth) has done a brilliant job of delving into each character’s personality and initiatives while still leaving a lot of mystery for readers to contemplate. Not to be discounted in the least, Michael Dialynas’ (thewoodencrown) artwork gives a unique look and feel to the multitude of genres represented. I’ve long been a fan of Dialynas’ work and seeing him tackle both endearing character moments as well as monstrous acts of violence is both refreshing and invigorating. Like a bright cherry atop this cake of terror, Jose Gonzalez’s colors add vibrance and surreality to this mysterious new world and its newest residents.

By now you might be asking yourself, “Why high school students? How will they survive? Who’s behind all this?”

Jump into The Woods now and find out!

[Read The Woods #3 on comiXology!]

For fans of: actionscience fictionhorror

Kate Kasenow is a comics artist from Indiana currently living in Manhattan. She works at ComiXology as a Lead Digital Editor and spends most of her spare time re-reading J. R. R. Tolkien.

A comiXologist Recommends:
Mike Isenberg recommends The Bargain Vol. 1

It’s New Year’s Eve 1955, and Jackson Connolly owes a debt that’s about to be due.  Ten years ago he made a bargain with a supernatural power; now his life and his soul will be forfeit, unless he can find a way out of the deal before the ball drops on 1956.

The Bargain, by Kara Barrett and J.C. Grande, is a supernatural noir comic that makes its way to us via Kickstarter and comiXology Submit.

Barrett and Grande successfully weave an atmospheric tale of southern horror and supernatural gloom.  In his quest for redemption, Jackson will travel from the swamplands of Louisiana to the burlesque clubs of New Orleans.  Along the way he’ll meet ghosts, witches, hell-hounds, and gods.  Jackson is determined to wheel and deal with all of them, hoping that his wits will be enough to free him of his debt, but he knows that he’s running out of time.

The ticking clock of Jackson’s soul-debt gives the book a palpable sense of doom and desperation that keeps the reader on their toes.  With the stakes so high—it’s not only his life on the line, but also an eternity of hellfire and torment—Jackson thinks he’s prepared to do anything to reach his goal.  But how far will he really go?  And even if he can break the bargain and save his soul, what will be left of it to save?

Volume 1 is a self-contained story, but it leaves room for more to follow.  The world that Barrett and Grande have created is fascinating and I hope there’s a Volume 2 in the works.  For fans of atmospheric supernatural noir stories like Hellblazer or Ten Grand, I can definitely recommend checking out The Bargain.

[Read The Bargain Vol. 1 Here!]

For fans of: action, noir, supernatural

Mike Isenberg is an Associate Production Coordinator at comiXology, and the co-writer of FIRST LAW OF MAD SCIENCE.  He lives in Harlem with his cats, TESLA AND EDISON