Not good, tell you what. 

If you ever have a problem with anything, email our support team at support@comixology.com. They’re pretty top notch, if we do say so ourselves. We’ll fix it right up.

It actually depends on publisher. DC and ONI release their books early in the day at 3AM EST. Then, we pull the trigger on other publishers generally around 9.30-10AM EST.

Also did you KNOW that you could subscribe to your favorite titles and be emailed right away when they are available for download???

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See “Superman” and Captain Carrot team off against The Avengers The Retaliators in Grant Morrison’s The Multiversity #1 for tonight’s Late Night Reads. 

aleskot:

If you believe that the relative lack of female representation in ‘Zero’ is an accident: no. 

When we began working on Zero #1, Jordie Bellaire, Michael Walsh & I had a very beneficial discussion about a scene in that issue. I wanted to start something, a tangential story, by covering Cooke’s genitals but not covering Zizek’s. We decided to change it and show both — and it feels like a right choice, because the lack of the feminine is already present within the story. Chapter #9, with Bosnia and the war atrocities against women, is a mid-point: this is how horrifying it can get. 

If you wanted another James Bond clone telling you war is okay: you were never going to get that with Zero. 

(Art by Tonci Zonjic)

(via imagecomics)

francavillarts:

FEAR OF THE UNKNOWN
Art by Francesco Francavilla

Happy Birthday, HPL.

Artprint available here

Cheers,
FF

kevinwada:

Edward Scissorhands Issue #2 Variant

yes please.

batgirlofburnside:

Don’t forget to PREORDER Batgirl #35 at your local comic shop TODAY!  If you haven’t already, please tell your retailer that you want - need - a copy of Batgirl #35.  
(Animated GIF by Babs!) 

batgirlofburnside:

Don’t forget to PREORDER Batgirl #35 at your local comic shop TODAY!  If you haven’t already, please tell your retailer that you want - need - a copy of Batgirl #35.  

(Animated GIF by Babs!) 

(via cameron-stewart)

A comiXologist Recommends:
Harris Smith recommends The Fade Out #1

From Criminal to Gotham Central to Fatale, there’s no disputing that Ed Brubaker is one of the modern masters of crime fiction.  The strength of his work derives from a keen synthesis of his influences, particularly 30’s-60’s hardboiled crime novels and film noir, combined with a streak of imaginative originality.  In Gotham Central, for example, he crafted an expertly written Ed McBain-styled police procedural and grafted it into the ongoing continuity of the DC superhero universe.  Fatale began like a Dashiell Hammet-influenced detective story, combined with an element of Lovecraftian  horror, then spun both ideas off in a variety of unexpected directions.  A significant factor in Brubaker’s appeal is that his influences are primarily stylistic, he doesn’t bog the reader down with excessive references or in-jokes, but rather uses his understanding of genre to capture its spirit, in the service of some often highly original storytelling.

In his latest, The Fade Out, from Image, Brubaker recalls the Hollywood-set noir of Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard, In a Lonely Place (originally a novel by Dorothy Hughes, later a film by Nicholas Ray, starring Humphrey Bogart) and The Big Knife (originally a Clifford Odets play, later a film by Robert Aldrich), as well as the non-crime desperation of Tinseltown-themed stories like The Day of the Locust (both Nathaniel West’s novel and John Schlesinger’s film, one of my personal all-time favorites) and Kenneth Anger’s salacious non-fiction Hollywood Babylon.  Like these classics, Brubaker casts a cynical eye on the glamor of the movie world and focuses on the corruption and decadence underneath.  Taking place in 1948, The Fade Out focuses on Charlie Parish, a seemingly burnt out screenwriter who awakens from a night of blackout drinking to discover he may or may not be implicated in a murder.  Along the way, Brubaker evokes Pearl Harbor, the Hollywood blacklist and other heady elements that ground the story in historical reality.  Tonally, The Fade Out expertly builds, in just the first issue, from uneasiness to dread to suspense and ends satisfyingly on a low-key cliffhanger that left me anxious to find out what could possibly come next.

If you’re a fan of Brubaker, you already know what kind of magic there is to be found here.  If you’re new to his work, this fresh, smart, exciting new series is a great opportunity to get onboard. 

[Read The Fade Out #1 on comiXology]

Harris Smith is a Brooklyn-based comics and media professional. In addition to his role as a Senior Production Coordinator at comiXology, he edits several comics anthologies, including Jeans and Felony Comics, under the banner of Negative Pleasure Publications. He’s also the host of the weekly radio show Neagtive Pleasure on Newtown Radio.

A comiXologist Recommends:
Mike Isenberg recommends Bandette #8

Whimsical and charming, gentlewoman thief Bandette is sure to steal your heart.

Written by Paul Tobin and drawn by his wife Colleen Coover (colleencoover), Bandette is a lighthearted crime tale about a young French girl who also happens to be the world’s greatest thief.

Bandette is cheerful and irreverent, never without a smile on her face and a joke on her tongue, even in the most deadly of circumstances.  This gleeful sense of fun permeates the whole series, and it’s hard not to smile along with Bandette as she “liberates” great works of art from the villains that covet them.

The last few issues have seen Bandette in a friendly competition with rival thief Monsieur, racing to pilfer a list of prized cultural artifacts belonging to criminal mastermind Absinthe.  Absinthe, meanwhile, has enlisted all the resources of his criminal enterprise FINIS to a singular task: kill Bandette.  Issue #8 sees things really start to heat up as Monsieur, Bandette, police inspector Belgique, Absinthe, and the dread assassin Il Tredici all converge on FINIS headquarters at the same time.

Coover has an airy, cartoony style, gorgeously watercolored, that sets the tone of the book perfectly.  Above all else, Bandette (the character as well as the book itself) is determined to have fun, and it’s clear on each page that Coover and Tobin have had a blast as well.

The Eisners nominated Bandette for four awards in 2013; Tobin and Coover ended up taking home the prize for Best Digital Comic.  It was well deserved; this is a wonderful read.  And at just 0.99 per issue, you really have no excuse not to check it out for yourself!

[Read Bandette # 8 Here!]

Mike Isenberg is an Associate Production Coordinator at comiXology, and the co-writer of FIRST LAW OF MAD SCIENCE.  He lives in Harlem with his cats, TESLA AND EDISON

A comiXologist Recommends:
Michael Crowe recommends Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2

Writer/Artist Ed Piskor (edpiskor) continues his epic journey through musical history with Hip Hop Family Tree Volume 2. Combining his passion for the musical genre with his mastery for creating comics, Piskor takes us on an encyclopedic journey through the growth of a uniquely American art form.

The 1980s were a time of expansion for the genre, across the country and the globe. This volume guides us through the continued rise of early hip hop originators alongside the birth of new acts inspired by these legends. It examines the intermingling between the uptown hip hop scene and thee downtown punk rock scene. It also documents the cultural exchange between New York arts culture and Hip Hop street culture. Piskor does a wonderful job of reminding the reader that this culture is more than the music. Hip Hop is an interdisciplinary art form that combines dance, visual art, musical production and lyrical genius to create an infectious form of modern art that’s craved en masse from Compton to Paris.

Ed Piskor’s art is stunning and his attention to detail is phenomenal. The pages appear to be printed on old textured paper. Each page pops despite the desaturated nature of the colors and the halftones used add even more texture to the pages. The result is a comic that feels straight out of the 80s. This attention to the aesthetic of a time is especially noticeable when flashing forward to the present. He illustrates these panels in a modern, highly saturated style common today. Piskor’s characterizations of classic players in the game are also unforgettable, and will evoke an immediate recognition from even a casual follower of hip hop culture.

For those interested in learning even more Piskor includes a bibliography and a discography to accompany the history he thoughtfully unravels for us. After you’ve finished reading and grooving be sure to pick up Hip Hop Family Tree Volume 1 to learn about the birth of Hip Hop and Wizzywig, Ed Piskor’s debut graphic novel about hacker culture.

[Read Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2]

Michael Crowe works on the digital assets/launch team by day and writes comics and prose by night. He’s an avid consumer of comics and all things sci-fi.