paulscheer:

CHECK IT OUT!!

1st look at the DEADPOOL ANNUAL, I co-wrote with Nick Giovannetti that bring back BRUTE FORCE

READ ABOUT IT HERE  

armlessphelan asked:

Some hot n spicy scifi CXrecs comin’ right up!

Prophet is amazing. One of my favorites. Big big royalboiler fan.

I asked around the office, as this is something I’ve been looking for also and here’s what I got:

  • Starstruck - An anarcho-futuristic adventure that eschews gender roles and linear storytelling. A cult classic science fiction comic if there ever was one. 
  • Old City Blues by milonogiannis, whom you might recognize from his work on Prophet! A futuristic noir involving corrupt politicians, drug dealers, and mech smugglers. 
  • Manhattan Projects - A current Image fan favorite, by pronea (Jonathan Hickman) and nickpitarra - A revisionist history that has the creation of the Atomic Bomb at it’s center. 

Also, if you like Brandon Graham, maybe try checking out some of his other stuff. Although it’s definitely not the same style as Prophet, Multiple Warheads is really amazing. 

Not good, tell you what. 

If you ever have a problem with anything, email our support team at support@comixology.com. They’re pretty top notch, if we do say so ourselves. We’ll fix it right up.

It actually depends on publisher. DC and ONI release their books early in the day at 3AM EST. Then, we pull the trigger on other publishers generally around 9.30-10AM EST.

Also did you KNOW that you could subscribe to your favorite titles and be emailed right away when they are available for download???

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See “Superman” and Captain Carrot team off against The Avengers The Retaliators in Grant Morrison’s The Multiversity #1 for tonight’s Late Night Reads. 

aleskot:

If you believe that the relative lack of female representation in ‘Zero’ is an accident: no. 

When we began working on Zero #1, Jordie Bellaire, Michael Walsh & I had a very beneficial discussion about a scene in that issue. I wanted to start something, a tangential story, by covering Cooke’s genitals but not covering Zizek’s. We decided to change it and show both — and it feels like a right choice, because the lack of the feminine is already present within the story. Chapter #9, with Bosnia and the war atrocities against women, is a mid-point: this is how horrifying it can get. 

If you wanted another James Bond clone telling you war is okay: you were never going to get that with Zero. 

(Art by Tonci Zonjic)

(via imagecomics)

francavillarts:

FEAR OF THE UNKNOWN
Art by Francesco Francavilla

Happy Birthday, HPL.

Artprint available here

Cheers,
FF

kevinwada:

Edward Scissorhands Issue #2 Variant

yes please.

batgirlofburnside:

Don’t forget to PREORDER Batgirl #35 at your local comic shop TODAY!  If you haven’t already, please tell your retailer that you want - need - a copy of Batgirl #35.  
(Animated GIF by Babs!) 

batgirlofburnside:

Don’t forget to PREORDER Batgirl #35 at your local comic shop TODAY!  If you haven’t already, please tell your retailer that you want - need - a copy of Batgirl #35.  

(Animated GIF by Babs!) 

(via cameron-stewart)

A comiXologist Recommends:
Harris Smith recommends The Fade Out #1

From Criminal to Gotham Central to Fatale, there’s no disputing that Ed Brubaker is one of the modern masters of crime fiction.  The strength of his work derives from a keen synthesis of his influences, particularly 30’s-60’s hardboiled crime novels and film noir, combined with a streak of imaginative originality.  In Gotham Central, for example, he crafted an expertly written Ed McBain-styled police procedural and grafted it into the ongoing continuity of the DC superhero universe.  Fatale began like a Dashiell Hammet-influenced detective story, combined with an element of Lovecraftian  horror, then spun both ideas off in a variety of unexpected directions.  A significant factor in Brubaker’s appeal is that his influences are primarily stylistic, he doesn’t bog the reader down with excessive references or in-jokes, but rather uses his understanding of genre to capture its spirit, in the service of some often highly original storytelling.

In his latest, The Fade Out, from Image, Brubaker recalls the Hollywood-set noir of Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard, In a Lonely Place (originally a novel by Dorothy Hughes, later a film by Nicholas Ray, starring Humphrey Bogart) and The Big Knife (originally a Clifford Odets play, later a film by Robert Aldrich), as well as the non-crime desperation of Tinseltown-themed stories like The Day of the Locust (both Nathaniel West’s novel and John Schlesinger’s film, one of my personal all-time favorites) and Kenneth Anger’s salacious non-fiction Hollywood Babylon.  Like these classics, Brubaker casts a cynical eye on the glamor of the movie world and focuses on the corruption and decadence underneath.  Taking place in 1948, The Fade Out focuses on Charlie Parish, a seemingly burnt out screenwriter who awakens from a night of blackout drinking to discover he may or may not be implicated in a murder.  Along the way, Brubaker evokes Pearl Harbor, the Hollywood blacklist and other heady elements that ground the story in historical reality.  Tonally, The Fade Out expertly builds, in just the first issue, from uneasiness to dread to suspense and ends satisfyingly on a low-key cliffhanger that left me anxious to find out what could possibly come next.

If you’re a fan of Brubaker, you already know what kind of magic there is to be found here.  If you’re new to his work, this fresh, smart, exciting new series is a great opportunity to get onboard. 

[Read The Fade Out #1 on comiXology]

Harris Smith is a Brooklyn-based comics and media professional. In addition to his role as a Senior Production Coordinator at comiXology, he edits several comics anthologies, including Jeans and Felony Comics, under the banner of Negative Pleasure Publications. He’s also the host of the weekly radio show Neagtive Pleasure on Newtown Radio.