christianward:

Here’s a little fact for you all- this is a prologue - made especially as a little taster treat before we hit with issue 1. These pages won’t actually be in issue 1 - so here they are in all their glory .

Say hello to your next favorite comic.

towritecomicsonherarms:

comixology:

towritecomicsonherarms:

Hack/Slash

Weekend Hack/Slash sale for all y’all horror freaks out there!

YO YO YO YO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Here you go people. A perfect opportunity to sample the greatness that is Hack/Slash.

This is what Hack/Slash is about

I suggest you start with My First Maniac 1-4 as it’s kind of an introduction/origin to the badass Cassie Hack.
It only has the stuff from Image Comics on there though. There’s loads more comics published by Devil’s Due Publishing.
Thank youuuu towritecomicsonherarms

beckycloonan:

GOTHAM ACADEMY interview with me is up on The Mary Sue! Plus new exclusive art from Karl Kerschl, and two variant covers by me! :D WOO! GET PSYCHED!!!

ramonvillalobos:

taste test

A boy can dream right?

Okay. →

gailsimone:

I know I’m late on this, but I am REALLY enjoying a terrific graphic novel called WATSON AND HOLMES by writer Karl Bollers and artist Rick Leonardi.

This is a really thrilling story so far, I’ve only just started and I had to put it down long enough to recommend it.

It’s on Comixology in single…

comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:
Michael Crowe recommends Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2

Writer/Artist Ed Piskor (edpiskor) continues his epic journey through musical history with Hip Hop Family Tree Volume 2. Combining his passion for the musical genre with his mastery for creating comics, Piskor takes us on an encyclopedic journey through the growth of a uniquely American art form.

The 1980s were a time of expansion for the genre, across the country and the globe. This volume guides us through the continued rise of early hip hop originators alongside the birth of new acts inspired by these legends. It examines the intermingling between the uptown hip hop scene and thee downtown punk rock scene. It also documents the cultural exchange between New York arts culture and Hip Hop street culture. Piskor does a wonderful job of reminding the reader that this culture is more than the music. Hip Hop is an interdisciplinary art form that combines dance, visual art, musical production and lyrical genius to create an infectious form of modern art that’s craved en masse from Compton to Paris.

Ed Piskor’s art is stunning and his attention to detail is phenomenal. The pages appear to be printed on old textured paper. Each page pops despite the desaturated nature of the colors and the halftones used add even more texture to the pages. The result is a comic that feels straight out of the 80s. This attention to the aesthetic of a time is especially noticeable when flashing forward to the present. He illustrates these panels in a modern, highly saturated style common today. Piskor’s characterizations of classic players in the game are also unforgettable, and will evoke an immediate recognition from even a casual follower of hip hop culture.

For those interested in learning even more Piskor includes a bibliography and a discography to accompany the history he thoughtfully unravels for us. After you’ve finished reading and grooving be sure to pick up Hip Hop Family Tree Volume 1 to learn about the birth of Hip Hop and Wizzywig, Ed Piskor’s debut graphic novel about hacker culture.

[Read Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2]

Michael Crowe works on the digital assets/launch team by day and writes comics and prose by night. He’s an avid consumer of comics and all things sci-fi.

Get schooled for this weeks #LongReads with the coolest book in the comiXology library.